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Mint tea – when and how do we give it to the baby?

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Mint is a herbaceous plant that produces a pleasant, fresh, menthol smell. It has been used for therapeutic and relaxing purposes for thousands of years and has great powers on the human body.

Mint tea

Mint, in particular, its leaves, contains a large amount of volatile oils, polyphenolic substances, tannins, flavonoids and bitter principles. Due to its high content of volatile oils, mint is used not only as a medicine, but also as a flavoring substance in cosmetic and food industry. Flavonoid compounds stimulate secretion and elimination of the bile. Mint also has antifermentative, disinfecting properties, mainly due to tannins, as well as spasmolytic properties. Menthol, when applied locally, has antiseptic, analgesic and decongestant effect on the respiratory tract. There are some studies that show that menthol has anticancer properties.

It has been shown so far that mint is useful in diarrheal disease, gall bladder diseases, and treatment of nausea or colic, including irritable bowel syndrome. Mint can be given as an antiseptic, analgesic and decongestant in inflammatory disorders of the nose, sinuses and respiratory tract.

Used externally, essential oil helps to soothe irritate skin and insect bites. Inhalation is useful in treating colds and flues. It can also be used as a mouthwash to treat oral infections. It also seems to heal headaches.

When can you give mint tea to a baby?

What all parents need to know is that doctors recommend that the baby who is exclusively breastfed until the age of six months should not consume water or tea. Breastfed babies do not need teas, apart from exceptional circumstances when they suffer from colic, constipation and diarrhea, and these must be natural teas. Excessive tea consumption, particularly for babies aged less than six months, can also have unpleasant effects, preventing iron absorption in the body, and sugary or instant sweet teas can cause stomach aches and agitation. Tea can also dehydrate the baby, since, when consumed in large amounts for his age, tea may overload his kidneys.

Therefore, after the age of six months, you can give your baby mint tea.

In which situation can you give mint tea to a baby?

Mint tea has beneficial effects if the baby has diarrhea, nausea or stomach pain, gas pain or sleep disturbances. Mint tea can also be used as a mouthwash because it eliminates the unpleasant odor and freshens his breath. It is excellent for colic, but if the child shows signs of constipation, the administration of mint tea should be interrupted.

How is it prepared?

For babies, it’s good to be careful about concentration and quantity. Mint tea should not be very concentrated, nor be given to the baby in very large quantities. Usually, four – five teaspoons of mint tea after a milk meal are enough for a baby.

Put one teaspoon of dry plant or two fresh mint leaves in boiling water (200 ml) and leave to infuse for about five minutes. Decant the tea. Give the tea to the baby using a teaspoon. The tea which is to be given to the baby is not sweetened with honey or sugar.

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Babies

Food diversification

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For the new parents, who are having their first child, everything is happening quickly. Each stage, starting with the moment she gets pregnant, comes with a multitude of questions and numerous answers that parents simply have to listen to, sort and apply only the most suitable ones. So, if it seems complicated and difficult in general, the stage we call Food Diversification comes with even more questions. For this reason, many of us are afraid of this period and consider it crucial in the growth and development of the baby.

We have already discussed in details in the articles from diversificarealabebelusi.ro about when and how food diversification begins.

In addition, most of the times, the greatest ally is the pediatrician, the person who has known the baby from the very first moments of his life. He can certainly make the best recommendations, regardless of their nature.

However, in order to help new mums, we have created this DIVERSIFICATION TABLE, this scheme that will prove to be very useful, based on the stage of growth you are experiencing.

In the Food Diversification Table you will find the main age groups as well as the foods you can introduce in the baby`s diet. Keep in mind that you have to take into account the three-day rule, which I also explained.

FOOD DIVERSIFICATION at 3 months

Foods allowed at 3 months:

  • Maternal milk;
  • Formula milk.
  • Other foods allowed at 3 months: NO

FOOD DIVERSIFICATION at 4 months

Foods allowed at 4 months:

  • Maternal milk;
  • Formula milk;
  • Fruits juices – only on doctor’s recommendation;
  • Cereals – only on doctor’s recommendation;
  • Cheese (fresh cheese made at home) – only at the doctor’s recommendation;
  • Vegetables – only at the doctor’s recommendation
  • Other foods allowed at 4 months: NO

FOOD DIVERSIFICATION at 5 months

Foods allowed at 5 months:

  • Maternal milk;
  • Formula milk;
  • Fruits juices – only on doctor’s recommendation;
  • Cereals – only on doctor’s recommendation;
  • Cheese (fresh cheese made at home) – only at the doctor’s recommendation;
  • Vegetables – only at the doctor’s recommendation.
  • Other foods allowed at 5 months: NO

FOOD DIVERSIFICATION at 6 months

Milk allowed at 6 months:

  • Maternal milk;
  • Formula milk;
  • Calcium cheese (fresh cheese made at home);
  • Yogurt (made at home);
  • Cream.

Fruits allowed at 6 months:

  • Apples;
  • Pears;
  • Peaches;
  • Nectarines;
  • Avocadoes;
  • Oranges;
  • Bananas;
  • Mangoes;
  • Plums;
  • Apricots;
  • Grapes;
  • Raisins;
  • Cherries;
  • Sour cherry;
  • Quinces;
  • Melon.

Vegetables allowed 6 months:

  • Parsley roots;
  • Potatoes;
  • Sweet potatoes;
  • Carrots;
  • Parsnip;
  • Zucchini;
  • Beetroot;
  • Cauliflower;
  • Green beans;
  • Onion;
  • Broccoli.

Cereals allowed at 6 months:

  • Rice;
  • Millet;
  • Buckwheat;
  • Wheat;
  • Oat;
  • Tapioca;
  • Rye;
  • Barley;
  • Maize.

Meat allowed at 6 months:

  • Chicken;
  • Turkey;
  • Chicken livers.

Eggs allowed at 6 months:

1/4 egg yolk (maximum 2 eggs per week).

Other foods allowed at 6 months:

  • Borsch;
  • Basil;
  • Caraway;
  • Thyme;
  • Dill;
  • Lovage;
  • Orache spinach;
  • Rosemary;
  • Oil;
  • Vanilla;
  • Chestnuts;
  • Biscuits;
  • Sesame seeds;
  • Nuts;
  • Cinnamon;
  • Cocoa.

FOOD DIVERSIFICATION at 7 months

Milk allowed at 7 months:

  • Maternal milk;
  • Formula;
  • Calcium cheese (fresh cheese made at home);
  • Yogurt made at home;
  • Sour cream.

Fruits allowed at 7 months:

  • Apples;
  • Pears;
  • Peaches;
  • Nectarines;
  • Avocadoes;
  • Oranges;
  • Bananas;
  • Mangoes;
  • Plums;
  • Apricots;
  • Grapes;
  • Raisins;
  • Cherries;
  • Sour cherry;
  • Quinces;
  • Melon.

Vegetables allowed at 7 months:

  • Parsley roots;
  • Potatoes;
  • Sweet potatoes;
  • Carrots;
  • Parsnip;
  • Zucchini;
  • Beetroot;
  • Cauliflower;
  • Green beans;
  • Onion;
  • Broccoli.

Cereals allowed at 7 months:

  • Rice;
  • Millet;
  • Buckwheat;
  • Wheat;
  • Oat;
  • Tapioca;
  • Rye;
  • Barley;
  • Maize.

Meat allowed at 7 months:

Chicken;

Turkey;

Chicken livers.

Eggs allowed at 7 months:

1/4 egg yolk (maximum 2 eggs per week).

Other foods allowed at 7 months:

  • Borsch;
  • Basil;
  • Caraway;
  • Thyme;
  • Dill;
  • Lovage;
  • Orache spinach;
  • Rosemary;
  • Oil;
  • Vanilla;
  • Chestnuts;
  • Biscuits;
  • Sesame seeds;
  • Nuts;
  • Cinnamon;
  • Cocoa.

FOOD DIVERSIFICATION at 8 months

  • Milk allowed at 8 months:
  • Maternal milk;
  • Formula;
  • Calcium cheese (fresh cheese made at home);
  • Yogurt made at home;
  • Sour cream.

Fruits allowed at 8 months:

  • Apples;
  • Pears;
  • Peaches;
  • Nectarines;
  • Avocadoes;
  • Oranges;
  • Bananas;
  • Mangoes;
  • Plums;
  • Apricots;
  • Grapes;
  • Raisins;
  • Cherries;
  • Sour cherry;
  • Quinces;
  • Melon.

Vegetables allowed at 8 months:

  • Parsley root;
  • Potatoes;
  • Sweet potatoes;
  • Carrot;
  • Parsnip;
  • Pumpkins;
  • Beet;
  • Cauliflower;
  • Green peas;
  • Onion;
  • Broccoli.

Cereals allowed at 8 months:

  • Rice;
  • Millet;
  • Buckwheat;
  • Wheat;
  • Oat;
  • Tapioca;
  • Rye;
  • Barley;
  • Maize.

Meat allowed at 8 months:

  • Chicken;
  • Turkey;
  • Chicken livers.

Eggs allowed at 8 months:

1/4 egg yolk (maximum 2 eggs per week).

Other foods allowed at 8 months:

  • Borsch;
  • Basil;
  • Caraway;
  • Thyme;
  • Dill;
  • Lovage;
  • Orache spinach;
  • Rosemary;
  • Oil;
  • Vanilla;
  • Chestnuts;
  • Biscuits;
  • Sesame seeds;
  • Nuts;
  • Cinnamon;
  • Cocoa.

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Babies

The clues in the baby’s stool that show us if the food diversification program we`ve chosen is the right one! Here’s what you have to pay attention to!

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Once the diversification has started, the problems continue to happen. Starting with this great adventure of raising a baby who does not communicate, does not eat on his own, does not sleep unless he is cradled, any mother is advised to pay attention to her baby. And it is also advised to pay attention to his stools as well.

From the very first day, when the baby is breastfed, till you have started the diversification program, you should pay attention to the baby`s stool. Maybe it seems quite uncomfortable to analyze the color, the texture and the frequency of his stool, but that’s how you can get the merits of a mother who knows her profession. Whenever you do this, you will know if your baby has a medical problem, if he or she suffers from an allergy, has diarrhea or is constipated, thus knowing the causes of such problems. You will know when to stop giving him a particular food, but also when to give him a medicine that will help his stomach.

Let`s start with the beginning!

Of course, we are at the stage of diversifying the baby’s diet, but maybe, who knows, there are mothers who want a brother for the one who is already experiencing the taste of solid foods, or maybe many mums try to get acquainted with diversification, though they have just given birth to their babies.

The baby’s first stool is quite sticky, dark green. This occurs because the baby removes the meconium, a substance he swallowed during his stay in his mother’s womb. So, this time, the texture or the color of his stool should not scare you.

In breastfeeding, the baby’s stool is quite different from that of a baby fed with formula milk. Usually, its color is yellow mustard and it is quite soft. In addition, you should know that a baby who receives breast milk will most certainly have many stools, almost after each milk meal, and this does not mean that he or she suffers from diarrhea.

The baby who is fed with formula milk does not have so many stools, so his mother will change only up to three dirty diapers. The color of the stool is darker, being firm in terms of consistency, and sometimes, due to iron, it may be greenish.

As time passes, the baby’s stools will be fewer and fewer. Besides, there may be a possibility for the baby to suffer from constipation, another quite unpleasant situation for any mother.

Let’s go back to diversification!

Solid food brings a change in the shape and structure of the baby’s stools. Typically, the introduction of solid food may have a significant influence on the frequency of his stools. Usually, baby`s stool gets darker and smelly, being harder than before. The color of the stool may resemble with what the baby has eaten, so do not worry if it is yellow or even orange … he probably ate more carrots.

The biggest problems arise during the diversification of the baby’s diet. The baby can pass from diarrhea to constipation, especially if the mother is not careful and mixes the food in a totally inappropriate way. Milk or food allergies, changing mother’s diet during breastfeeding, taking medications that cause diarrhea as an adverse effect, introducing too much juice in the diet may cause undesirable effects for your baby. He may suffer from diarrhea. However, it is not excluded that the presence of a digestive virus may cause severe diarrhea.

In the situations mentioned above, it is advisable to be careful and to hydrate your baby as much as possible. Monitoring is another condition that a new mum must meet. If the baby’s condition is getting worse, if he vomits or there are blood stains in his stools, you must go see a doctor. Diarrhea should be carefully investigated because it can be extremely dangerous.

Constipation is also very frequent during the diversification of the baby’s diet. It is possible that some foods are good for the baby, while others aren`t. That’s why you should pay great attention. However, experts believe that during the first period of the diversification process, it is normal for the baby to be constipated, since he has to adapt to a new type of food. Even if you do not change completely to solid foods, more exactly you don`t stop breastfeeding, the baby needs time to adapt his digestive process to his new needs.

Apple or plum juice helps combat constipation. So, whenever you notice that the baby’s stool is hard or if he has a stool every two or three days and you have the feeling that he is being bothered by something, it is good to consider a slightly laxative diet recommended by your doctor. Babies shouldn`t be given laxatives, such medications are not appropriate for their sensitive stomach.

Whenever you go through such problems, you should see your doctor. He will recommend you the best solutions so that the baby will not go again through such unpleasant situations. Also, if the baby is constipated, change a little bit his diet, it is possible that a certain food is not good for him. In addition, give up the habit of inserting the thermometer into the baby`s butt to help him have a stool because it may cause injuries.

Our recommendation is to go see your doctor as soon as possible.

 

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How should babies sleep? Here are some sleep positions recommended by kinesiotherapists!

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Sleeping and eating have a crucial role in baby`s developing. That’s why a good sleep is all you need in order to raise calm and relaxed babies.

Kinesiotherapists claim that the only recommended sleep position for babies is on the back.

Restful and safe sleep – sleep on the back

Research has shown that there is a link between baby sleeping positions and baby death, also known as sudden infant death syndrome. The risk of death is greatly reduced if the baby sleeps on the back. The first researches in this regard have been conducted in New Zealand, and since then similar studies have been conducted in almost all countries of the world, with the same results. No one knows exactly why it is safer for the baby to sleep on the back rather than on the tummy, but there are several theories.

A theory proposed by kinesiotherapists is that sleeping on the back without pillows keeps the baby’s spinal column in a right position, allowing the baby to develop properly and harmoniously.

Another theory is that a baby sleeping on his tummy risks not to be oxygenated as well as one who sleeps on the back, and this is due to the fact that around the nose will be objects that will make the breathing more difficult.

Another possibility is that the baby can suffocate when he is sleeping on his tummy. Under no circumstances you should use a waterbed for the baby. There have been cases in which babies sleeping on waterbeds suffocated because the mattress clings to the body shape. Therefore, babies should not sleep on waterbeds.

A fourth theory is that the microbes in the mattress can interfere with baby’s breathing, causing all kinds of affections.

Nobody has yet solved the mystery of the baby’s sudden death, but nowadays, cases are more and more rare, and this is because doctors recommend parents to put their babies to sleep on the back.

Is sleeping on one side a safe position?

If you are not convinced of the benefits of sleeping on the back, you can put the baby to sleep on one side. It’s a pretty safe position, doctors say, but there are also some risks. It seems that those sleeping on one side can turn quickly on the tummy, which increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. In addition, kinesiotherapists claim that this position can affect the spine because the baby can`t be put in a perfect position so that the head, the neck and the legs are perfectly aligned.

What happens if regurgitation occurs?

In the past, doctors thought sleeping on the back could be dangerous for babies with regurgitation problems. It was thought that the baby could suffocate because he did not have enough strength to turn his head. However, studies have shown that babies sleeping on the back had no problem turning their head when feeling sick.

What should you do when the baby starts to turn alone?

After the age of six months, babies are strong enough to turn from one side to the other. This means that when he feels something is wrong, he can turn to a position in which he feels more comfortable. So, you do not have to turn the baby on his back whenever he stays on one side or on his tummy. When you put the baby to sleep, put him on his back, and then you do not have to watch him.

Tips for a safe sleep

–  The mattress must be firm to maintain the spinal column in a right position.

– The bed must be solid, and in the first three months of life, it should be tilted to 30 degrees.

– Don`t put toys, pillows or blankets in the baby`s bed.

– Do not cover the mattress with any plastic wrap because there is a risk of choking.

– Babies do not need pillows, especially a big pillow.

 

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